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18/Jan/2019

How to ‘move more’ and reach your physical activity goals

When it comes to physical activity, we’re often told we need to move more. But what does this actually mean? How much exercise or physical activity should women aim to be doing?

The Australian Government has its recommendations, but what does this look like in the real world? We asked three women about their physical activity habits, to see if their weekly quotas reached the recommended amounts.

We also called in the help of Jean Hailes Head of Translation, Education and Communication, and President of the Australasian Society of Behavioural Health and Medicine, Dr Helen Brown, to give some tips, encouragement and advice to help them along their way.

A few things to know before we get started…

The recommendations for adults (aged 18-64 years) per week are:

  • 150-300 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity, or
  • 75-150 minutes of vigorous intensity physical activity, or
  • an equivalent combination of both.

Remember: moderate intensity activities require some effort (puffing a little, but able to carry out a conversation), whereas vigorous intensity activities require us to breathe much harder (make us puff and pant).

These recommendations also include the total time you spend doing ‘incidental physical activity’ – that is, the tasks in your daily life that include being active; for example, walking to the bus stop, doing the shopping, or taking the stairs instead of the lift.

Incidental physical activity often occurs in bite-sized chunks and can be an easier way to build up to the recommended levels required for good health.

Nina, age 42

First-up is Nina. Nina is a mother of two girls, aged two and four. Nina works two days a week and often feels too stressed and busy to be active. “I always feel better after I do some exercise,” she says, “but with the kids and work, it’s always a juggle or a struggle, and some weeks are crazier than others.”

Nina lives within biking distance to work and sometimes cycles to and from work. On her non-working days, Nina estimates she does 20 minutes of (moderate intensity) incidental physical activity a day – mostly made up of cleaning the house, carrying the shopping, pushing the pram and generally running after her two little ones.

 

Here’s an average week for Nina:

Activity Intensity of activity How long Times/ week Total
Cycling trips to / from work Moderate 20mins 2 40
Incidental activity Moderate 20mins 5 100
Total moderate Moderate     140mins

 

What Dr Brown says:

Firstly, well done on doing some physical activity! It can be hard to find the time to do more in your jam-packed days, so instead, I would suggest you try to include more incidental physical activity and weave it into the tasks you’re already doing.

For example, you could walk with your girls to kinder, or when dropping them at a nearby friend’s house. Or, when you’re with your youngest, you could walk and push the pram, and try building up to a slow jog – this would be a good way to increase your vigorous intensity minutes and you’ll get more bang for your buck.

Keep up the cycling to work and, if you can, try to increase this to twice a week.

All the smaller bits and pieces add up too; for example, walking around a shopping centre can be counted towards your daily physical activity.

Bronwyn, age 24

Next up is Bronwyn. Bronwyn works full-time, often over-time. During the week, she feels she doesn’t have a lot of time for exercise. “On workdays I’m too stressed,” she says. “I try to pack in my exercise on the weekend, but sometimes all I want to do is hang out with my friends or sleep.”

Bronwyn uses her car a lot and her incidental activity is about 5-10 minutes a day, mainly consisting of walking around the office, to get a coffee and while doing her weekly shop.

 

 

Here is Bronwyn’s physical activity on a plate:

Activity Intensity of activity How long Times/ week Total
Boxing class at local gym Vigorous 40mins 1 40
Walk around the park Moderate 30mins 1 30
Incidental activity Moderate 5mins 5 25
Total moderate       55mins
Total vigorous       40mins

 

What Dr Brown says:

Being busy and stressed is a really common barrier to people being physically active. But it’s important to know that being active has physical benefits as well as mental benefits and can help to manage worry and anxiety.

I would suggest including a 20-minute brisk walk outside as part of your workday at lunchtime. This would add 100 minutes to your weekly quota, and you’ll feel better both mentally and physically.

Try blocking out the time in your work calendar and make it a ‘non-negotiable’ part of your workday. Keep a pair of sneakers at work and some leggings and socks in your desk drawer to make it easier. You could also consider talking with your manager about the possibility of getting a few stand-up desks at work or doing a weekly walking meeting.

All that said, walking is not enough for bone health, so I would recommend trying to include other impact activities on the weekend – boxing class is great, or see what other classes your local gym offers. Maybe even see if you can find a friend or gym buddy and go together – that way you can motivate each other and it makes it more fun.

Aggie, age 63

Lastly, is Aggie. Aggie is fit and flexible for her age. She lives alone, works three days a week and has a busy social life. Aggie has “never liked exercise and didn’t grow up playing sport”, but is active most days of the week, doing both physical activity for fun or socially, as well as part of her weekly chores.

 

 

Here is Aggie’s week of activity:

Activity Intensity of activity How long Times/ week Total
Nature bushwalk or walk around the river with friends Moderate 60mins 1 60
Walking daughter’s dog Moderate 30mins 1 30
Gardening Moderate 30mins 2 60
Incidental activity Moderate 5mins 7 35
Total Moderate     185mins

 

What Dr Brown says:

This is a great example of how you don’t necessarily need to be ‘sporty’ or ‘do exercise’ to meet the requirements. Well done, Aggie!

Gardening is a great way to keep active, as it’s excellent for flexibility and muscle strength. Plus, doing it with friends makes it more fun! The nature walks are another great way to be social and active at the same time. My recommendation for Aggie would be to try and include some uphill routes, as this would benefit her bone health.

A final word from Dr Brown for all women:

A good phrase to remember is: ‘Doing some is better than none.’ Start small and build up to the recommended levels. You don’t need to start off running a marathon; even a gentle walk is a win. Work some exercise into your day – whatever that looks like. And remember to include muscle strengthening activity, such as lifting, carrying or skipping, at least two days a week.

From the Jean Hailes website.

Published with the permission of Jean Hailes for Women’s Health
jeanhailes.org.au
1800 JEAN HAILES (532 642)


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18/Jan/2019

Via  jeanhailes.org.au

Published with the permission of Jean Hailes for Women’s Health

Was it the reheated leftovers from three – or was it four or five – days ago? Or the sandwich you bought one day from that café you thought looked a bit dirty? Or maybe it was the salad that spent too long out of the fridge? Whatever the culprit, chances are you’ve been affected by food poisoning at some point in your life.

Food poisoning affects an estimated 4.1 million people in Australia every year. The symptoms of food poisoning can range from mild to severe, but there are steps you can take to reduce your risk, says Jean Hailes dietitian Stephanie Pirotta.

Food poisoning is caused by bacteria, toxins or viruses present in the food or drinks we consume. In Australia, food poisoning is commonly due to bacteria, namely the Campylobacter or Salmonella bacteria types.

However, as Ms Pirotta explains, not all bacteria are bad for you; some bacteria in food is normal – and in some cases, such as the good bacteria found in yoghurts, it can even be beneficial.

“Bacteria becomes a problem and can cause food poisoning when they grow to unsafe levels, or if the type of bacteria present in the food is harmful,” says Ms Pirotta.

Symptoms of food poisoning may include nausea (feeling sick), vomiting, stomach pains, diarrhoea (loose watery bowel motions), feeling weak, headache, fever, chills or sweating. When the symptoms start, how long they last and how serious they are can depend on many factors.

A common assumption is that food poisoning is caused by the last thing the person ate. However, this is often not the case, says Ms Pirotta. “Symptoms of the bacteria Campylobacter food poisoning [one of the most common culprits] usually develop two to five days after eating the food,” she says. And which food is usually the guilty party in cases of Campylobacter? “This type of illness is frequently associated with eating undercooked chicken,” says Ms Pirotta.

So how can you best protect yourself? Below Ms Pirotta answers some frequently asked questions.

What are some potentially ‘high risk’ foods of food poisoning?

Many people know that chicken or fish are common sources of food poisoning, but there are other common foods that can be potentially dangerous. Sources of food poisoning will usually look, smell and taste normal, so in this way it can be hard to detect.

Some potentially high-risk foods include:

  • raw and cooked meat (including red meat, chicken, turkey and seafood) and foods containing these, such as a casserole or curry
  • eggs and foods containing eggs, such as omelette or quiche
  • dairy products and foods containing these, such as custard or cheesecake
  • deli meats and smallgoods, such as ham or salami
  • cooked rice and pasta
  • prepared foods, such as coleslaw, pasta salad, rice salad, fruit salad and other ready-to-eat foods such as a sandwich/roll/leftover pizza that contain foods listed above
  • opened pre-packaged foods (can, carton or plastic container/bag), especially foods not refrigerated straight after they are opened.

What is the ‘temperature danger zone’?

This is the temperature range in which harmful bacteria can grow to unsafe levels in food. The danger zone is between 5⁰C and 60⁰C.

This means it is best to keep cold foods cold – in your fridge, set below 5⁰C – and hot food should be kept and served hot – at 60°C or hotter. Using a food thermometer is an easy way to measure food temperature. These can be bought at most supermarkets.

For freshly cooked food that you’re not going to eat straight away, the Australian Food Safety Information Council advises to cool them to below the danger zone as quickly as possible: divide food into small shallow containers and place in the fridge or freezer as soon as it stops steaming.

How do you know if a food has been out of the fridge too long, if it can be put back in, or when it should be thrown away?

The ‘2 hour/4 hour rule’ tells you how long potentially high risk foods can be safely held at temperatures in the danger zone – for example leaving the food outside the fridge, after cooking or at the table.

  1. If the food has been in the danger zone for two hours or less, it is generally considered safe to eat OR to put back in the fridge to eat later.
  2. If the food has been in the danger zone for 2-4 hours, it is generally considered safe to eat straight away (not stored for later).
  3. If the food has been in the danger zone for four hours or more, it may be unsafe to eat and should be thrown away.

What’s the deal with cooked rice?

Many people are unaware that cooked rice, when improperly stored, is a common source of food poisoning. Cooked rice is a perfect growing ground for bacteria as it is moist, full of carbohydrates for energy and provides heat. Rice grains often contain the bacteria Bacillus cereus. These bacteria can form spores that are able to survive the high temperatures of cooking. If uneaten rice is cooled slowly and left in the temperature danger zone for too long, tiny spores can grow and produce a harmful toxin (poison).

This also means reheating the cooked rice does not kill the spores or destroy the toxins that have already been produced in the rice, so they can still make you ill.

Food poisoning symptoms from this bacteria and its toxins usually consists of vomiting and/or diarrhoea for up to 24 hours.

What are some other tips we can practise at home to avoid food poisoning?

  • When cooking or preparing food, try to prevent food or food surfaces coming into contact with other parts of your body or your clothing (also, wear clean clothing when cooking)
  • Cover any cuts or abrasions on your body
  • When preparing food, wash your hands using warm water and soap before you start, as well as:
    • after going to the toilet (ensure you remove any aprons prior to going)
    • after touching other body parts and coughing, sneezing, smoking, blowing your nose, eating
    • before handling ready-to-eat food (such as salad)
    • after touching raw foods (such as meat)
  • Use different utensils/ chopping boards for ready-to-eat foods and raw meats
  • Do not prepare food if you are ill or experiencing diarrhoea and/or vomiting
  • When buying food, ensure that the food packaging seal is unbroken, within its use-by date and that the can is not dented.

Food can be a celebration and bring great joy as well as healthy nutrition to your life and body. Let’s keep it that way by following Ms Pirotta’s advice. Find out more about good nutrition on the Jean Hailes website.


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18/Jan/2019

The recommended treatment time for non-urgent patients is 2hrs at emergency departments. Add a few life threatening emergencies and that 2hr wait can extend significantly.

In 2016 at Gold Coast university hospital 100,432 people went through the emergency department and the team there did an amazing job at treating those people.

The average wait time according to myhospitals.gov.au was 5 hrs and 31 minutes – compare this with a regional hospital such as Wollongong which was over 13hrs! The Gold Coast team ROCK!

https://www.myhospitals.gov.au/compare-hospitals/time-in-emergency-departments

The challenge for families and something we are asked a great deal is – we suggest when it’s not an emergency but could be serious.

An example might be, a child with a fever, cough and headache especially in winter. Or a person with a skin infection or rash that just seems to be getting worse.

Gastro bugs are always high on our list as it’s important to minimise the spread and keeping a person at home with a gastro bug reduces the chance of spreading into the community.

For many older people living at home in our community, simply being able to be treated at home can be more comfortable for the patient and their family.

We ensure though that anyone we do see has their consultation notes sent to their GP. This ensures the continuity of care and we recommend following up with your local GP as an important part of the process. After all they know you.

Dial A Home Doctor offers remarkable medical care when you need it most. If someone at home is sick after hours or on the weekend, just dial a home doctor on 139999.

Dial A Home Doctor is a free bulk billed after-hours Doctor service – We Come To You.

*Home Doctor Guaranteed within 90mins. If you book online Mon-Fri by 4:30pm, Sat & Sun by 10:30am. We reserve the right to take more time in case of giving priority to more serious conditioned patients as we always attempt to prioritise young children and the elderly.

The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition


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18/Jan/2019

One question we get asked a lot is “When should I call an after-hours doctor?”

While it may seem logical – there are actually standards and rules that we as an after-hours service have to follow.

We can only take calls from

  • 4pm on a week day with doctors arriving to begin appointments at 6pm. Before this, it will go to a voice mail advising we cannot take bookings.
  • From 10am on a Saturday – again doctors arrive a little later with appointments beginning from midday through until the wee hours
  • All day on a Sunday or public holiday – our doctors and care team are available to take calls and bookings.
  • Bookings can be made online, however these are only processed after 4pm on a week day and 10am on a Saturday.

Our job is again to support the community with an after-hours service only. To ensure local GP clinics and practices have support for their patients when they can’t be there. And to reduce the strains on the emergency departments.

Dial A Home Doctor offers remarkable medical care when you need it most. If someone at home is sick after hours or on the weekend, just dial a home doctor on 139999.

Dial A Home Doctor is a free bulk billed after-hours Doctor service – We Come To You.

*Home Doctor Guaranteed within 90mins. If you book online Mon-Fri by 4:30pm, Sat & Sun by 10:30am. We reserve the right to take more time in case of giving priority to more serious conditioned patients as we always attempt to prioritise young children and the elderly.

The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition


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18/Jan/2019

Everyday families are supported by their local GP; Doctors that manage all of those day to day and sometimes life changing health events.  Without them we are all just a little stuck. Clinics are open longer to assist however even GPs need a break. Up until a few years ago if someone got sick after hours it was a case of go it alone or visit the emergency department.

Thankfully now we have an alternative with dedicated after-hour medical services available to cover GP clinics when they are closed – in the evening during the week, Saturday afternoons and night as well as all day Sunday and public holidays.

The team at Dial A Home Doctor actively encourage all patients to see their own GP on a regular basis as there is no substitute for someone that knows you, knows your situation and history.

However there may be times where your GP just isn’t available, such as public holidays,  or when a child comes home from school unwell – you’ve just walked in the door from work and your GP is closed.

Or its Saturday evening, your elderly mum or dad has a cough that is worse and you are worried that they shouldn’t wait until Monday.

At times like this, having the ability to call on a free bulk billed home doctor service can be invaluable.

The Dial A Home Doctor team will visit you at home, provide necessary scripts and in many cases provide you with enough medication until the pharmacy opens. This way someone that is ill can stay safe and comfortable in their own home.

Dial A Home Doctor offers remarkable medical care when you need it most. If someone at home is sick after hours or on the weekend, just dial a home doctor on 139999.

Dial A Home Doctor is a free bulk billed after-hours Doctor service – We Come To You.

*Home Doctor Guaranteed within 90mins. If you book online Mon-Fri by 4:30pm, Sat & Sun by 10:30am. We reserve the right to take more time in case of giving priority to more serious conditioned patients as we always attempt to prioritise young children and the elderly.

The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition


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18/Jan/2019

Did you know that July was JULeYe month? A month dedicated to raising the awareness of eye health – did you see it? (LOL note the pun!)

Vision loss like many health concerns only becomes an issue when you begin to experience it. Losing a key sense can be debilitating and can affect day to day life in an enormous way. From being able to read a book to driving a vehicle. Sight is often the overlooked sense in terms of regular health checks.

Good eye health starts with regular testing from a young age as eye disease is not just an affliction of the elderly.

Here are 5 tips for children’s eye health that as parents we can all encourage including carrots!

Be Eye Aware: Early detection and treatment is the best defence against eye disease. Symptoms to watch out for include rubbing of eyes, poor hand-eye co-ordination, lack of concentration and complaining of headaches, blurred or double vision;

Green is Great! Provide your child with a balanced, nutritious diet rich in fruit and vegetables. Dark green leafy vegetables such as spinach and yellow vegetables such as pumpkin and carrot will help to keep your child’s eyes healthy; yes carrots do help you see in the dark!

Hats Help: Make sure that your child always wears a broad­‐brimmed hat when playing outside as this will reduce the amount of UV reaching your child’s eyes by up to half;

Specs Appeal: When in the sun, make sure your child wears sunglasses with UV to protect their eyes from damaging UV rays; Slip Slop Slap and WRAP on some sunnies is a great way to encourage our children to focus (yes another pun!)

Balls Galore: Encourage appropriate eye protection when your child is playing sports. Fast action sports such as tennis, hockey and cricket can provide some serious eye damage if the hand eye coordination is slightly off and there isn’t any protection!

Dial A Home Doctor offers remarkable medical care when you need it most. If someone at home is sick after hours or on the weekend, just dial a home doctor on 139999.

Dial A Home Doctor is a free bulk billed after-hours Doctor service – We Come To You.

*Home Doctor Guaranteed within 90mins. If you book online Mon-Fri by 4:30pm, Sat & Sun by 10:30am. We reserve the right to take more time in case of giving priority to more serious conditioned patients as we always attempt to prioritise young children and the elderly.

The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition


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18/Jan/2019

Now we all know about Grandmas recipe for fixing this ailment or that. The memories of castor oil as the panacea for all ills! And there is something to be said for some of the more sensible remedies. But then were the completely outrageous ideas that come under the category of “DO NOT DO THIS AT HOME!”

Urine cures acne!

Early American settlers had some pretty strange notions when it came to eradicating acne. One involved the application of urine to the outbreaks. Another called for using the water that collected in old tree stumps to bathe pimpled skin. Needless to say, neither has been studied nor is it worth trying.

Dirty socks cure sore throats!

Used widely until the 20th century, this remedy called for wrapping your own dirty socks around your throat. Our guess? Since sore throats are so contagious, and in the olden days a signal of potentially lethal diseases, the dirty socks were used to keep loved ones as far away as possible from the patient.

Chocolate-garlic cures memory loss!

An old, traditional memory-booster calls for dipping garlic cloves in chocolate and eating one to three of them a day. In theory, we think this makes tons of sense — the garlic and the chocolate are loaded to the gills with the kind of antioxidants that protect brain cells. But seriously, in practice? No thanks —chocolate-covered cranberries are so much tastier!

Rattlesnakes cures rheumatism!

An old cure for “rheumatism” was to kill a rattlesnake before it had a chance to strike (always a clever idea), skin it, dry it, and then put the remains in a jug of corn whiskey. Then, drink the whiskey. No surprise: There’s no science to support this (and it’s a little too dangerous to recommend).  And the fact we don’t have rattlesnakes here in Australia means this one is just a little limited!

*Home Doctor Guaranteed within 90mins. If you book online Mon-Fri by 4:30pm, Sat & Sun by 10:30am. We reserve the right to take more time in case of giving priority to more serious conditioned patients as we always attempt to prioritise young children and the elderly.  

The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition


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18/Jan/2019

It seems like a bygone era, but it wasn’t so long ago that doctors would visit the sick at home and house calls were considered the norm.

The GP home visit is making a comeback though, as the Government Health Department urges people to keep the emergency department (ED) for emergencies. It is estimated that nearly 40 per cent of all ED presentations are deemed inappropriate or non-urgent, potentially GP-type visits that could have been managed in the community.

GPs that offer home visits after hours are on the rise in Queensland and the service is free under Medicare as it is a bulk billed service.

Mum-of-two and Dial A Home Doctor National Marketing Manager Donna Kirk said often people were just looking for reassurance that nothing more serious was wrong.

“Most people aren’t doctors, we don’t know what’s wrong with us,” she said. “We think we have the flu, but sometimes we’re just not sure.

“We’re looking for reassurance. And when the GP is closed, we think the only other place to get that reassurance is the ED. But there is another option – you can dial a home doctor on 139999 and have a doctor come to you.”

One group of people who can really benefit from after-hours GP home visits are the elderly in our community.

According to the Australian Centre for Health Research (ACHR), an increasing number of older patients (over 70 years) were attending the ED, many over four times per year.

Some elderly people tend to be more cautious and reluctant to put people out, preferring to be stoic, get through the night and wait until ‘normal hours’ to visit the doctor.

The problem is, as they become frailer, waiting 24 hours can actually cause more harm than you think. Having the flu will cause a more significant impact in an elderly person if they don’t see the doctor straight away.

Ms Kirk said apart from many people not realising the after-hours GP service existed, there was a common perception that calling a doctor to visit you at home was bound to be an expensive exercise.

“People think it’s going to be expensive,” she said. “But we are a bulk-billed service through Medicare. We are completely free.”

“Don’t be scared to ring! This is what we are here for.”

Dial A Home Doctor offers remarkable medical care when you need it most. If someone at home is sick after hours or on the weekend, just dial a home doctor on 139999.

Dial A Home Doctor is a free bulk billed after-hours Doctor service – We Come To You.

*Home Doctor Guaranteed within 90mins. If you book online Mon-Fri by 4:30pm, Sat & Sun by 10:30am. We reserve the right to take more time in case of giving priority to more serious conditioned patients as we always attempt to prioritise young children and the elderly.

The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition


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18/Jan/2019

It is after-hours. Your child or elderly parent is unwell. In fact they have a raging temperature, are hot and cold, perhaps vomiting or complaining of a headache. The flu is rampant and as a carer, you just aren’t 100% sure whether you should seek urgent medical treatment or go it alone until the morning?

Waiting until the morning can provide for a sleepless night for all, and as we know a lack of sleep can impact even the most resilient of us.

So what do you do? You can pack the children up – yes the healthy ones too to head to your nearest public hospital’s emergency department. Remember to pack some snacks for the healthy hungry kids, possibly a bucket, towel, wet wipes and a blanket for the unwell patient. And don’t forget some activities to distract everyone during the long wait, and there will be a wait, potentially a wait until the wee hours of the morning.

The seats are cold and hard, the lights glaring and uncomfortable. The walk to the toilet is the only way to stretch the legs and your childs blanket is looking inviting… and you wait…

In Western Australia, on *Monday 21st August at 2:35pm there was an estimated 3.2hour wait to be triaged (assessed) by the team at Joondalup Health Campus. That’s a long time when you have a restless sick child.

 

You are getting through the night sanity intact, when your child seems to perk up the minute the nurse walks in and calls your name  – you know this… you’ve been there! It’s been an interminable wait for a clinician to assess your child, identify it’s not life threatening and let you know you are on the list….

And you just want to go home, stretch out on your own bed and close your eyes…

And you can… if you know who to call.

By using the FREE Bulk Billed services of a house call doctor, such as Dial A Home Doctor, you get to:

  • remain in the comfort of your own home
  • manage other children easily by ensuring they are following their normal routine
  • have a cup of tea and watch TV
  • know your sick child or elderly parent is safe and COMFORTABLE with you.

Yes in peak periods such as Flu season, there might be a lengthy wait, but the experience of being in your own space minimizes the inconvenience. You can even let the ill patient sleep – in fact for children this can be a benefit as the Doctor can often assess a sleeping child better than an irritable crying child.

 

There isn’t any need to go it alone when you can simply Dial A Home Doctor, get a house call and its free!

Let’s work together and save emergency for emergency!

 

There is another solution

 

Courtesy http://www.health.wa.gov.au/emergencyactivity/edsv/index.cfm


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18/Jan/2019

While many grandparents play a key role in the lives of their children and grandchildren, there is a growing number of grandparents becoming the key carers of their grandchildren.

This can happen for a variety of reasons however the reason is almost a moot point when it comes to the day to day challenges of raising a child. The ‘why’ isn’t as important as the ‘how’!

The love and willingness of a grandparent can become the impetus to meet any challenge head on, and those challenges can be great.

Financial – when an older person has come to the end of their active income years, money can be tight, and we all know raising a child can be expensive!  Thankfully there is more financial support from the government to alleviate this.

Health – as we get older the aches and pains seem to become more noticeable and often chronic conditions warrant assistance for the older person. Let’s be frank, keeping up with a young man who wants to play footie every afternoon can tax even the younger parents!

Times have changed – staying up-to-date with technology and education can make a grandparent feel ‘out of touch’ as so much would have changed since their raised their own children.

What hasn’t changed is the worry a grandparent feels when their grandchild is sick. And when it’s after-hours, the usual GP clinic is closed and everyone is tired and just wants to relax. The thought of a few hours at the local hospital can also be mentally draining.

And this is where the services of people such as those from Dial A Home Doctor can help. Provided the child has a Medicare Card, and it’s not life-threatening, a local doctor can come to the family home and see the child.

This House Call Doctor service can be accessed as easily as dialing 139999. In peak periods, there may be a wait, however waiting at home with a cuppa in the warmth of home is far more tolerable than the cold hard emergency room chairs sharing bugs with everyone else.

So, if you know of a grandparent looking after their grandchildren, tell them about Dial A Home Doctor and encourage them to call anytime they or their grandchildren need a doctor after-hours.

Dial A Home Doctor is a free bulk billed after-hours Doctor service – We Come To You.

*Home Doctor Guaranteed within 90mins. If you book online Mon-Fri by 4:30pm, Sat & Sun by 10:30am. We reserve the right to take more time in case of giving priority to more serious conditioned patients as we always attempt to prioritise young children and the elderly.

The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition


Dial A Home Doctor

Dial A Home Doctor (DAHD) is a privately-owned Australian company, focused on delivering bulk billed after hours doctor services to patients in their homes by our highly qualified team of doctors.

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